News

Information Session for 2017 programs

Information Session for 2017 programs

Sep 29, 2016

This Coming Wednesday October 5, (Week 10 of Semester) we’ll be hosting an information session for the 2017 programs in Basement Theatre 1 of the School of Geography at 221 Bouverie Street.This year has flown by and we are now approaching the end of Semester 2, enrolments open on the 17th of October and before deciding what subjects you’ll be taking next semester it is worth coming by to this info session to find out about why it’s worth considering an intensive field study program this summer.If you’re interested in studying with RESEED next year we’ll be running four programs in South Africa, 2 in summer and 2 in Winter. You can find out more details about each program here.RESEED programs give you an awesome reason to travel over the summer break while also giving you the chance to get 25 points closer to your degree. It can leave you freer for the rest of the semester to work and save or pursue internship opportunities alongside your regular semester 1 subjects.By studying with RESEED you’re also making a conscious decision to take a program which is offered by a social enterprise. Our programs promote social, environmental and entrepreneurship development and the academic investment we make towards students taking our programs is matched by our commitment to helping partner communities flourish.If you can make it on Wednesday not only will you be able to find out all the details about the new subjects, enrolment procedures, costs, and extra-curricular experiences, you’ll also be able to garner a better insight into what the RESEED business model is and how we engage with local communities to develop and sustain long-term positive impacts.We’ll hope to see you there and if you need any more information or have any other questions please let us know by filling out a contact form.Let us know you're coming along by heading to our facebook event page. 3-week summer field study program open to 3rd/4th year undergraduate students and postgrads 20 places available on each trip Program Costs cover all local transfers, entry fees, accommodation and meals during the trip Optional Safari to Kruger National Park OS HELP loans and Financial assistance available
Behind the "Cultural Heritage and Landscape Management" program and the Koni people

Behind the "Cultural Heritage and Landscape Management" program and the Koni people

Aug 29, 2016

“Endless stone circles, set in bewildering mazes and linked by long stone passages, cover the landscape stretching from Ohrigstad to Carolina, connecting over 10,000 square kilometres of the escarpment into a complex web of stone-walled homesteads, terraced fields and linking roads.” (witspress, 2014) In mid 2014, Prof Peter Delius of Witwatersrand University alongside Peter Schoemann and Tim Maggs published a book telling the story of this landscape. Together, Delius (Professor of History) and archaeology lecturers Maggs and Schoeman have pieced together the history and society of the Koni people. Take a look at this story from the Amanda Esterhuysen (Mail and Guardian) who explains why “Forgotten World” is such a captivating book which tells a compelling but untold history of a forgotten people and their land: http://mg.co.za/article/2015-02-26-the-bokoni-story-unearthed
2015 students start fundraising for communities visited

2015 students start fundraising for communities visited

Aug 18, 2016

In February 2015, field studies students left South Africa after an 18-day field studies program that introduced them to complex theories and brought them face-to-face with amazing communities and individuals working towards a better South Africa. Back in Australia, the students have started to fundraise as a means to give back to some of the organisations visited earlier this year. Based on the tradition started many years ago, each alumni group fundraises and sends money back with the next group of students. And while on the trip, students witness first hand what these funds mean to the organisations on the ground and are catalysed into action upon return to Australia. "What the community based organsations value is that the students cared enough about them and what they do, that they made the effort to raise funds after going back home and then sent it along with the next group,” says Associate Professor Haripriya Rangan who has been running the field trip since 2002. “It is the way the funds are raised and sent across that touches them. It is continuity and connection that they value, and that’s why they have so much affection for our students." The tradition started in 2002, when Corinne Bowman collected books and other materials for a primary school in a rural area that their group visited on the trip. She organised it so that the students on the 2003 trip brought the materials with them and delivered it to the school during their visit. Corinne started a tradition that still stands today and kindles student’s connection with the communities they met, long after they’ve left South Africa. With photos from the trip, a former student put together a calendar and photo book for students to buy. With a small additional donation, the 2015 students have raised AUD$125 for the communities back in South Africa. "I put together the calendar as a memento for the 2015 students, and the credit goes to them for parting with a couple extra hard earned dollars to kick start the fundraising," says Tina Thorburn, 2011 alumni who went on the 2015 trip as a Research Assistant. Past student groups have raised funds in a variety of ways, and no doubt the 2015 students will too. To find out more about how to get involved, please email: contact@reseed.com.au
Bi-annual alumni gathering 2015

Bi-annual alumni gathering 2015

Aug 18, 2016

Every two years, Associate Professor Haripriya Rangan throws open the doors to her home to bring together alumni from the South Africa field studies program. Between eating delicious food and catching up on news, the alumni enjoy the opportunity to meet participants from other years and network. This year the event brings the announcement of exciting news. After sixteen years at Monash University, Priya will be leaving the institution at the end of June 2015 and take up a research fellow role at the University of Melbourne. She will continue to work on a big collaborative ARC project that explores and compared indigenous perspectives about how they describe the value of plants in their landscapes. Priya credits Monash University for allowing her the opportunity to run the field studies program across over a decade. "I am so glad that both the Deans of the Arts Faculty, Homer Le Grand and Rae Frances, saw the enormous benefit this field-study program would offer for students, and made sure that it was recognised by the university administrators," says Priya. As she prepares to move on from Monash, Priya has been working with a group of field studies alumni to launch RESEED as a social enterprise and work towards gaining the necessary capital to run programs in 2016. Priya believes the opportunity they had as students has shaped their passion for field studies, and sparked the formation of RESEED. "The students who have done the program are really the reason why this has been so successful. RESEED is the product of their passion and commitment," says Priya. Having run nine field studies programs to South Africa, Priya is keen to build on the established relationships with stakeholders on the ground and continue to make this life-changing field trip available for university students across the world. Stay tuned for more news about RESEED’s work and upcoming events.

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